Posts by Tomas Wyns

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The Potential Contribution of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in a 2015 Climate Agreement

In the next two years, negotiators and experts will need to work out how to configure a comprehensive 2015 international climate agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. At the 17th conference of the parties in Durban, climate diplomats agreed to chart out a work plan (i.e. the Durban platform for enhanced... continue reading »

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CCAP Supports Structural Reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

Last week the European Parliament supported a temporary measure that will stabilize the EU carbon price in the coming years. This so called "backloading" proposal will delay the auctioning of up to 900 million EU allowances over the next several years. These allowances will then be returned to the market before 2020. Although a positive move, a more fundamental reform to the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) will be required in the near future in order to address the structural surplus of EU allowances. continue reading »

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The New Deal: Reforming the EU ETS to Enhance Low-Carbon Industrial Competitiveness

The Center for Clean Air Policy-Europe published a new report today called “The New Deal: An Enlightened Industrial Policy for the EU through Structural EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) Reform.” This report recommends seven reforms to the EU ETS to spur the innovation and investments required to create a thriving and low carbon industrial sector. These reforms include the setting aside of EU ETS allowances into an industrial low-carbon transition fund, a price management mechanism, the structural adjustment of the EU ETS caps toward 2050 and a comprehensive assessment of competitiveness issues related to the EU ETS. continue reading »

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Enhancing the Environmental Integrity of International Climate Action by Solving the Kyoto Protocol Allowance Surplus

Assigned Amount Units (AAUs) are the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission allowances under the Kyoto Protocol. One AAU allows a country to emit 1 tonne of CO2 equivalent. Kyoto Protocol rules allow countries to carry over unused emission allowances into the next commitment period. A number of countries, such as Russia, Ukraine and Poland, have very... continue reading »

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Climate Action in the Absence of a Global Carbon Market

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), once the flagship for supporting climate action in developed and developing countries, is facing tough times. Estimates by UNEP-Risoe show a massive imbalance between supply and demand for carbon credits in the coming years. It has been predicted that about 7 billion CDM credits will be generated between 2013 and... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Nepal

Many people in rural areas of Nepal lack access to clean, cheap, and reliable energy. Nationwide, just over 40 percent of Nepalese have access to electricity. To help alleviate poverty and promote rural development, Nepal created the Alternative Energy Promotion Centre (AEPC) in 1996 to deliver alternative energy systems to Nepal’s rural population. By 1999,... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Rwanda

As it has boosted its economy and worked to improve the quality of life since the 1994 genocide, the small East African country of Rwanda has promoted its high-elevation tea farms. Today, tea makes up 36 percent of the country’s gross domestic product. But electricity, much needed for tea processing, is in short supply –... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Colombia

For years, the Colombian capital, Bogota, has been striving to develop a more sustainable transportation system within the city, and in the process has earned itself international praise for its success in developing a bus rapid transit system, bike corridors, and restrictions on private cars. So it seemed like only a matter of time before... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Sudan

Environmental degradation has been both a cause and a result of the armed conflict that has plagued parts of Sudan for years and displaced numerous inhabitants. This has led to rapidly increasing urban populations in the country. This urbanisation, in turn, has resulted in unsustainable demand for fuel, particularly the timber needed for fuel wood,... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Nigeria

In Nigeria, wood is an important resource as most people use wood for cooking on traditional fireplaces. Over the last several years wood has become exceptionally expensive. Due to a high level of deforestation in the north, wood expenditures per meal are 10 times the costs of food a family purchases. While United Nations activities... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Tunisia

Roughly 7,400 households in Tunisia used solar water heaters in 2005. By 2011, 133,340 households did – a market transformation that might have seemed impossible before a financing mechanism helped accelerate the development of a robust solar water heating market. Understanding this shift has proven useful for other solar energy financing programs in developing countries.... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Mongolia

Often called nature’s insulation, straw-bale building materials have been proven to increase energy efficiency. This super-insulation both reduces heating costs significantly – by up to 70 percent – and cuts greenhouse gas emissions. Given the brutally cold winters, lack of wood products in many parts of Mongolia, and the abundance of locally available straw that... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Sri Lanka

Over half of Sri Lanka’s motor vehicles – and a quarter of its population – are in the capital of Colombo, leading to air pollution problems and a high concentration of greenhouse gas emissions. But this concentration also presents an opportunity, as the city’s compact boundaries and population density– along with relatively inexpensive electricity, a... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in Bangladesh

Bangladesh aspires to deliver electricity to all of its citizens by 2020. This goal will be impossible to meet with traditional power generation because most people live out of reach of power lines. Even within the grid, the system suffers. Power plants now operating produce only about 4,700 megawatts of power to meet the country’s... continue reading »

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Climate Finance Works in India

Over 60 percent of Indian households do not have electricity. Instead, they rely largely on kerosene for their lighting, which leads to indoor air pollution, GHG emissions and high fuel costs. To help address these problems, the social enterprise D. Light produced a solar-powered light-emitting diode (LED) lamp which could be distributed to the poorest... continue reading »

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The Year of the Dragon: How China will Move Ahead on Climate Action in 2012 and Beyond

The impressive gigantic Chinese pavilion at COP17 in Durban might have been a coincidence but it may actually be a sign of the times. One thing is clear, the Chinese government’s confidence in implementing climate and energy legislation seems to be growing. In the coming years we expect the implementation of a new five-year economic... continue reading »

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The Champ is back: Where will Europe’s newfound climate leadership take us in 2012?

We all remember Europe being sidelined in the final hours of the 2009 climate conference in Copenhagen. Most observers agreed this was caused by obstacles involving internal disagreements and leadership. The hangover of this humiliating diplomatic defeat of a former climate champion lingered for quite a while in every European policymaker’s mind. Those days seem... continue reading »